OUR FOOD FOOTPRINT

What was the carbon footprint of your dinner last night? Agriculture is a huge emitter of greenhouse gases associated with climate change. This is an important emerging topic as Americans grapple with recent heatwaves, storms and other weather extremes as “the face of global warming”.

Farmers Market
Farmers market at Oakland, CA public elementary school

As listeners will learn in this sound-rich series, climate scientists increasingly focus on food production as a source of heat-trapping gases. We’ll discuss which foods have the lowest environmental footprint (fruits and vegetables) and which have the highest (red meat and dairy), and why. What’s fascinating is that public health experts recommend that we emphasize in our diets the same foods that scientists regard as most climate-friendly. That’s the connection between diet and climate.

Meanwhile, landmark changes in USDA school meal requirements have recently taken effect. We will explain the new rules (which mandate that more fruits and vegetables be served to children), based on the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act signed by President Obama. In our First Hour, we explore a new movement on hundreds of college campuses for more “sustainable dining”, as well as the coming changes in public school cafeterias.

In our Second Hour, we’ll go food shopping with a physician and author, dig into the scientific details of the diet-climate link, and visit the White House vegetable garden, as well as community gardens where growing locally is viewed as part of the solution.

Free to stations on Content Depot
Go to: Humankind Diet-Climate

Also available on PRX:
Go to: Humankind Diet-Climate

Click here for an mp3 audition of Hour 1
(Right-click to download-- Mac users: Control-click)

Healthy Fruit
For more information, please contact:

Steve Martin (703-715-0827)
steve@sfmconsulting.com

David Freudberg (617-489-5130)
dfreudberg@humanmedia.org


This Humankind special project is produced in cooperation with Connie Goldman Productions. Funds were provided by the Henry P. Kendall Foundation, the Grantham Foundation for the Protection of the Environment, the Henry Luce Foundation and the Lintilhac Foundation.

Organic farmers Erin Johnson and Ben Doherty (with daughter), Northfield, MN

Organic farmers Erin Johnson and Ben Doherty (with daughter), Northfield, MN

Sam Kass

Sam Kass, White House chef and food policy adviser

Roni Neff

Dr. Roni Neff, Johns Hopkins University school of public health

Rosalind Brooks (R), founder of Tonopah Community Garden, with volunteer, Las Vegas, NV

Rosalind Brooks (R), founder of Tonopah Community Garden, with volunteer, Las Vegas, NV

Thomas Hudspeth, University of Vermont prof. of environmental studies

Thomas Hudspeth, University of Vermont prof. of environmental studies

Neal Barnard, physician, host of PBS health specials

Neal Barnard, physician, host of PBS health specials